North American Artists-2

UNITED STATES’ ARTISTS, page 2:

FRANK COBURN * GRANT WOOD * THOMAS HART BENTON * ARCHIBALD MOTLEY, JR. * NEWELL CONVERS (N. C.) WYETH * ANDREW WYETH * HENRY OSSAWA TANNER * WALTER GAY * JOHN SLOAN * GEORGE LUKS * REGINALD MARSH * GERTRUDE FISKE * ALICE NEEL * MARTIN GASSER * JACKSON POLLOCK * LEE KRASNER * MARK ROTHKO * HELEN FRANKENTHALER * DEBORAH BUTTERFIELD * JEAN MICHEL BASQUIAT * KERRY JAMES MARSHALL * HENRY TAYLOR * JORDAN CASTEEL * NICK CAVE * LOUIS COMFORT TIFFANY * LEO VILLAREAL * SAN FRANCISCO ARTISTS [ DAVID PARK * ELMER BISCHOFF * RICHARD DIEBENKORN] *

UNITED STATES’ PHOTOGRAPHERS:

ROBERT FRANK * ANSEL ADAMS * VIVIAN MAIER * GORDON PARKS * WALKER EVANS * DOROTHEA LANGE * IMOGEN CUNNIINGHAM * EDWARD WESTON * LEE FRIEDLANDER * JOHN GUTMANN * HELEN LEVITT * DIANE ARBUS * WRIGHT MORRIS * RICHARD AVEDON * ROBERT ADAMS * GARY WINOGRAND

MEXICAN & CENTRAL AMERICAN ARTISTS:

FRIDA KAHLO * DIEGO RIVERA * RUFINO TAMAYO * FRANCISCO ZUNIGA * ARMANDO MORALES

CANADIAN ARTISTS:

EMILY CARR * TOM THOMSON

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Regionalist painter (Iowa) Grant Wood:

Another Regionalist painter, this one from Missouri:

Reginald Marsh (March 14, 1898 – July 3, 1954) was an American painter, born in Paris, most notable for his depictions of life in New York City in the 1920s and 1930s. Crowded Coney Island beach scenes, popular entertainments such as vaudeville and burlesque, women, and jobless men on the Bowery are subjects that reappear throughout his work. He painted in egg tempera and in oils, and produced many watercolors, ink and ink wash drawings, and prints:

TO SEE WORKS AND BIOGRAPHY OF HENRY MARTIN GASSER CLICK HERE

Deborah Butterfield’s sculptural forms are based on her unique subject, horses. Constructed in wood, and cast in bronze, the freestanding sculptures are shown in two scales: life size works and smaller bronzes. With extraordinary focus and conviction, Butterfield works independently of the tides of trends and art movements. She has become a master of three-dimensional images of horses, building her sculptures with no sketches or maquettes, working directly with wood pieces or found metal scraps.

Great African American Neo-expressionist painter who died young:

In his short career, Jean-Michel Basquiat was a phenomenon. He became notorious for his graffiti art under the moniker Samo in the late 1970s on the Lower East Side scene, sold his first painting to Deborah Harry for $200 and became best friends with Andy Warhol. Appreciated by both the art cognoscenti and the public, Basquiat was launched into international stardom. However, soon his cult status began to override the art that had made him famous in the first place… His dense, bebop-influenced neoexpressionist work emerged while minimalist, conceptual art was the fad; as a successful black artist, he was constantly confronted by racism and misconceptions. Much can be gleaned from insider interviews and archival footage, but it is Basquiat’s own words and work that powerfully convey the mystique and allure of both the artist and the man.

Blurring the lines between LED and projections, New York-based light artist Leo Villareal uses modern technology to create an ethereal experience for the viewer:


SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA ARTISTS



AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHERS

In 2007, a cache of more than 10,000 photographic negatives was sold at auction. The man who bought them soon discovered beautiful images of Chicago street scenes from the mid-20th century. Who was the unknown artist behind the photographs?:

Gordan Parks:

The soundtrack to the video below is an odd choice, but the photos are great:

Edward Weston:

John Gutmann:

Wright Morris:



MEXICO & CENTRAL AMERICA

Great Mexican painter from 20th century:

Great social-realist painter from Mexico and lover of Frida Kahlo:

Nicaraguan painter:



CANADA

Canadian Artist and Writer: Emily Carr studied in San Francisco in 1889-95, and in 1899 she traveled to England, where she was involved with the St. Ives group and with Hubert von Herkomer’s private school. She lived in France in 1910 where the work of the Fauves influenced the colourism of her work and she came into contact with Frances Hodgkins. Discouraged by her lack of artistic success, she returned to Victoria where she came close to giving up art altogether.

However, her contact with the Group of Seven in 1930 resurrected her interest in art, and throughout the 1930s she specialized in scenes from the lives and rituals of Native Americans. She also showed her awareness of Canadian native culture through a number of works representing the British Columbian rainforest. She lived among the native Americans to research her subjects. Many of her Expressionistic paintings represent totem poles and other artefacts of Indian culture.–Learn from Masters, Inc.

“Tom Thomson was a renowned Canadian painter and artist during the early 20th century, who inspired the formation of the ‘Group of Seven’, the first national school of art in Canada, established in 1920. After taking up different odd jobs in Canada and the US, he returned to his hometown, Ontario, to pursue a career in arts. While working in various photo-engraving firms, he honed his artistic skills and started making weekend painting trips with a couple other adventurous painters, until he discovered Algonquin Park, which became his painting hub. His wilderness-themed paintings and sketches were largely inspired by this provincial park. Some of his career’s most popular artworks have been ‘The Northern River’, ‘The Jack Pine’, and ‘The West Wind’. He died unexpectedly at a time when he had just started mastering his craft and getting some recognition. He is counted among Canada’s hugely talented artists, for his superb portrayal of Canadian wilderness on the canvas, his marvelous use of striking colors, and simple interpretation of landscapes. He has been highly credited and appreciated by art historians for marvelously capturing the rugged beauty of Algonquin Park during the early 1910s.”–Learn From The Masters, Inc.:

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