Japanese, Chinese, African, Russian Artists & Others

JAPANESE ARTISTS: KATSUSHIKA * HIROSHI YOSHIDA * SHIRO KASAMATSU * ITO JAKUCHU

CHINESE ARTISTS: GAO XINGJIAN * WEN ZHENGMING *

 AFRICAN ART: TRIBAL ART FROM THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, NYC * MASTERPIECES OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM: HEAD OF IFE, KING FROM NIGERIA * OLOWE OF ISE * ETHIOPIAN ICONS * COPTIC ART

RUSSIAN ARTISTS: IVAN KRAMSKOY * ISAAC LEVITAN * ILYA REPIN * VALENTIN SEROV * NICOLAI FECHIN * IVAN SHISHKIN * MIKHAIL LARIONOV * NATALIA GONCHAROVA * ALESSIO ISSUPOFF * IVAN POKHITONOV

MIDDLE EASTERN ARTISTS: MONA HATOUM * TAMMAM AZZAM

[RETURN TO ARTISTS INDEX]

 

JAPANESE ARTISTS



 

CHINESE ARTISTS

WEN ZHENGMING, 1470-1559

WANG HUI, 1632-1717

 



 

AFRICAN ARTISTS

Beautiful Tribal Art selections from the African Art collection at the Metropoiitan Museum of Art, NY.

Tribal Art from the Fang, Benin, Bwa, Ekoi, Baule, Bambara, Bete, Songye, Kota, Mahongye, Bembe, Dogon, Senufo, and Chokwe:

Music for above video by Pure Magic with Rebecca. Album: South African Rhythm Riot.

 


Ethiopian art from the 4th century until the 20th can be divided into two broad groupings. First comes a distinctive tradition of Christian art, mostly for churches, in forms including painting, crosses, icons, illuminated manuscripts, and other metalwork such as crowns. Secondly there are popular arts and crafts such as textiles, basketry and jewellery, in which Ethiopian traditions are closer to those of other peoples in the region. Its history goes back almost three thousand years to the kingdom of D’mt. The Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church has been the predominant religion in Ethiopia for over 1500 years, for most of this period in a very close relation, or union, with the Coptic Christianity of Egypt, so that Coptic art has been the main formative influence on Ethiopian church art.–Behkit Fahim:

Coptic Christian art from Egypt (from Art of Eternity – Painting Paradise, BBC4). Presented by Andrew Graham-Dixon:

Art of Ancient Nubia (lecture series from Museum of Fine Arts, Boston):



 

RUSSIAN ARTISTS

 

 


Ilya Yefimovich Repin was a Russian realist painter. He was the most renowned Russian artist of the 19th century, when his position in the world of art was comparable to that of Leo Tolstoy in literature. He played a major role in bringing Russian art into the mainstream of European culture. His major works include Barge Haulers on the Volga (1873), Religious Procession in Kursk Province (1883) and Reply of the Zaporozhian Cossacks (1880–91).
Repin was born in Chuguyev, in the Kharkov Governorate (now Ukraine) of the Russian Empire into a military family. He entered military school in 1854 and in 1856 studied under Ivan Bunakov, a local icon painter. He began to paint around 1860. He met his wife, Vera Shevtsova in 1872 (they remained married for ten years). In 1874–1876 he showed at the Salon in Paris and at the exhibitions of the Itinerants’ Society in Saint Petersburg. He was awarded the title of academician in 1876. In 1880 Repin traveled to Zaporozhia in Ukraine to gather material for the 1891 Reply of the Zaporozhian Cossacks. His Religious Procession in Kursk Province was exhibited in 1883, and Ivan the Terrible and His Son Ivan in 1885. In 1892 he published theLetters on Art collection of essays. He taught at the Higher Art School attached to the Academy of Arts from 1894. In 1898 he purchased an estate, the Penates, in Kuokkala, Finland (now Repino). In 1901 he was awarded the Legion of Honour. In 1911 he traveled with his common-law wife Natalia Nordman to the World Exhibition in Italy, where his painting 17 October 1905 and his portraits were displayed in their own separate room. In 1916 Repin worked on his book of reminiscences, Far and Near, with the assistance of Korney Chukovsky. He welcomed the Russian Revolution of 1917. Celebrations were held in 1924 in Kuokkala to mark Repin’s 80th birthday, followed by an exhibition of his works in Moscow. In 1925 a jubilee exhibition of his works was held in the Russian Museum in Leningrad. Repin died in 1930 and was buried at the Penates.”–LearnFromMasters

 

INDONESIAN ARTISTS

IRANIAN (PERSIAN) ARTISTS

CENTRAL AMERICAN ART

MIDDLE EASTERN ARTISTS

PALESTINE

SYRIA

Syrian artist-in-exile Tammam Azzam, whose romantic yet uncompromising body of work forces us to see the crumbling devastation and despair of today’s world. Born in 1980 in Damascus, he is presently one of Syria’s rising young artists. . . Upon losing his studio in Damascus and needing new ways to express himself and his sadness with the events that were unfolding in his homeland of Syria, Azzam began working with digital art. . . Witty, smart and certainly a major part of today’s world when everything gets played digitally or via social media, Tammam Azzam has used his artistic abilities to reflect on the worsening situation in Syria. He has also cleverly referenced street art, recognizing both of these mediums as powerful, difficult to suppress, direct tools for protest. In early 2013, Azzam made headlines world wide when one of his works, ‘Freedom Graffiti’ went viral on social media. He enlisted one of the most iconic kisses in art – Gustav Klimt’s ‘The Kiss’ – to protest his country’s suffering, superimposing this image of love over the walls of a war-torn building in Damascus. The work was from his ‘Syrian Museum’ series in which he placed images taken from Western Art History by such masters as da Vinci, Matisse, Goya, Gaugin, Van Gogh, Dali and Warhol…. paralleling some of the greatest achievements of humanity with the destruction of Syria’s cultural heritage.

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